Update(Al Dia)

Update(Al Dia)

IMMIGRATION TAX NEWS

by CDoris Rodriguez on 01/13/15

January 8th, 2015
On November 20th, 2014 President Obama announced an executive action on immigration
which could extend relief from deportation to an estimated 5 million undocumented
immigrants.

Under the new directive, immigrants will need to show proof of "continuous residence"
from January 1, 2010 to present.  One guide for immigration attorneys suggests that
clients may show this by presenting complete tax returns including forms W-2 and
 1099.

In addition, we are being told to advise client to "start reporting your income
to the IRS by filing income tax returns, as well as payment of any taxes owed."

Health Care Law Brings Changes to IRS Tax Forms

by CDoris Rodriguez on 01/13/15

This year, there are some changes to tax forms related to the Affordable Care Act. Along with a few new lines on existing forms, there will also be two new forms that will need to be included with some tax returns. While most taxpayers will simply need to check a box on their tax return to indicate they had health coverage for all of 2014, there are also new lines on Forms 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ related to the health care law.

 

Here is information about the new forms and updates to the existing forms:

Form 8965, Health Coverage Exemptions

  • Complete this form to report a Marketplace-granted coverage exemption or claim an IRS-granted coverage exemption on the return.
  • Use the worksheet in the Form 8965 Instructions to calculate the shared responsibility payment.

Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit

  • Complete this form to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit, and to claim this credit on the tax return.

Additionally, if individuals purchased coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, they should receive Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, which will help complete Form 8962.

 

2014 Standard Mileage Rates

by CDoris Rodriguez on 01/13/15

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2014 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2014, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 56 cents per mile for business miles driven

  • 23.5 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes

  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

    The business, medical, and moving expense rates decrease one-half cent from the 2013 rates.  The charitable rate is based on statute.

    The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs.

    Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

    A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle.  In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

     

DEDUCTING MOVING EXPENSES

by CDoris Rodriguez on 08/18/14

Deducting Moving Expenses

 

If you move because of your job, you may be able to deduct the cost of the move on your tax return. You may be able to deduct your costs if you move to start a new job or to work at the same job in a new location. The IRS offers the following tips about moving expenses and your tax return.

 

In order to deduct moving expenses, your move must meet three requirements:

 

1. The move must closely relate to the start of work.  Generally, you can consider moving expenses within one year of the date you start work at a new job location. Additional rules apply to this requirement.

 

2. Your move must meet the distance test.  Your new main job location must be at least 50 miles farther from your old home than your previous job location. For example, if your old job was three miles from your old home, your new job must be at least 53 miles from your old home.

 

3. You must meet the time test.  After the move, you must work full-time at your new job for at least 39 weeks the first year. If you’re self-employed, you must meet this test and work full-time for a total of at least 78 weeks during the first two years at the new job site. If your income tax return is due before you’ve met this test, you can still deduct moving expenses if you expect to meet it.

 

  • Travel.  You can deduct transportation and lodging expenses for yourself and household members while moving from your old home to your new home. You cannot deduct your travel meal costs.

     

  • Household goods and utilities.  You can deduct the cost of packing, crating and shipping your things. You may be able to include the cost of storing and insuring these items while in transit. You can deduct the cost of connecting or disconnecting utilities.

     

  • Nondeductible expenses.  You cannot deduct as moving expenses any part of the purchase price of your new home, the cost of selling a home or the cost of entering into or breaking a lease. SeePublication 521 for a complete list.

     

  • Reimbursed expenses.  If your employer later pays you for the cost of a move that you deducted on your tax return, you may need to include the payment as income. You report any taxable amount on your tax return in the year you get the payment.

     

  • Address Change.  When you move, be sure to update your address with the IRS and the U.S. Post Office. To notify the IRS file Form 8822, Change of Address.

     

What to do if You Get a Notice from the IRS

by CDoris Rodriguez on 07/02/14

What to do if You Get a Notice from the IRS

 

Each year the IRS mails millions of notices. Here’s what you should do if you receive a notice from the IRS:

 

1. Don’t ignore it. You can respond to most IRS notices quickly and easily. And it’s important that you reply promptly. 

 

2. IRS notices usually deal with a specific issue about your tax return or tax account. For example, it may say the IRS has corrected an error on your tax return. Or it may ask you for more information.

 

3. Read it carefully and follow the instructions about what you need to do.

 

4. If it says that the IRS corrected your tax return, review the information in the notice and compare it to your tax return.

 

If you agree, you don’t need to reply unless a payment is due.

 

If you don’t agree, it’s important that you respond to the IRS. Write a letter that explains why you don’t agree. Make sure to include information and any documents you want the IRS to consider. Include the bottom tear-off portion of the notice with your letter. Mail your reply to the IRS at the address shown in the lower left part of the notice. Allow at least 30 days for a response from the IRS.

 

5. You can handle most notices without calling or visiting the IRS. If you do have questions, call the phone number in the upper right corner of the notice. Make sure you have a copy of your tax return and the notice with you when you call.

 

6. Keep copies of any notices you get from the IRS.

 

7. Don’t fall for phone and phishing email scams that use the IRS as a lure. The IRS first contacts people about unpaid taxes by mail – not by phone. The IRS does not contact taxpayers by email, text or social media about their tax return or tax account.